Tag Archives: Gardening

A Simple Plant Kills Up To 98% Of Cancer Cells – And Stops Diabetes

Bitter-Melon

By: Dr. Robert Rowen | I’m always looking for natural substances that throw a “monkey wrench” into the peculiar metabolism of cancer cells. It’s vital these substances kill cancer cells and leave normal cells untouched.

I’ve told you about some of my discoveries in the past. They include resveratrol, green tea, Seanol, and others. But today I’m going to tell you about another plant that safely starves cancer cells as efficiently as a powerful chemo drug. In fact, it even works on pancreatic cancer cells, which are particularly difficult to kill. Continue reading A Simple Plant Kills Up To 98% Of Cancer Cells – And Stops Diabetes

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Here’s another “weed” that is actually a superfood

Yet another weed that most of us pull and throw away has been uncovered as a super healing wonder herb. A recent study has found nettle to potently kill breast cancer cells.

If you have nettles in the backyard we strongly recommend that you collect and use them as part of your daily diet. Not only are the roots and the young leafy tops of stinging nettle edible, they are also very good for you. You can cook them and eat as food, use as an extract or herbal tea. Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) can supply your body with lots of beneficial nutrients. Continue reading Here’s another “weed” that is actually a superfood

Tips for Growing a Kitchen Herb Garden

Growing and Using Culinary Herbs

By: Marie Iannotti, Reblogged from: About.com Guide

herbs

Probably the most popular herbs to grow and use are the culinary herbs. Herbs used for cooking and seasoning can be incorporated into your existing flower or vegetable beds, grown separately near the kitchen door or kept handy on the kitchen counter. Growing culinary herbs is very similar to growing vegetables. The two most important considerations are to harvest at full flavor and to never use any fertilizer or pesticide on them that isn’t labeled for use on edible plants. Here are some more tips for growing flavorful culinary herbs.

Planting & Growing Kitchen Herbs

  • Annual herbs are inexpensive and easy to start from seed. Woody, perennial herbs establish better if you purchase seedlings or take cuttings.
  • Plant your herbs in a rich, well-draining soil and avoid heavy feeding with supplemental fertilizer. The scent and flavor of herbs tends to concentrate when they are grown in slightly lean conditions. (Going to the extreme and starving them or growing them in poor soil will have the opposite effect. The plants will be stressed and stunted.)
  • Limit pesticide use to an absolute minimum. If you must spray, use the least toxic solution.

Design Considerations for a Kitchen Herb Garden

  • Keep them handy. You will use them more often if they are within easy reach. And their beauty and scent will probably inspire your cooking creativity.
  • Culinary herbs can do double duty as ornamental plants. Parsley, especially the curly variety, makes a wonderful edging plant, if you don’t have rabbits nearby. Tall herbs, like bay laurel, can be potted and used as focal points. Herbs with variegated leaves, like golden or tri-color sage, are great in mixed containers. Don’t let the notion that these are seasoning herbs limit your use of them.
  • Herbs that tend to spread, like mint and oregano, can be grown in containers. The containers can be sunk into the ground, in the garden, or used as accent pots. Just don’t let the tips of the plants hang over and touch the ground, or they will root and grow.

Tips for Using Culinary Herbs

  • Most annual herbs taste their best before they flower. Once the annual herbs flower, they older leaves begin to decline and new leaves are smaller and bitter.
  • Pinch and use often. Even young plants need to be pinched back to encourage them to branch out and become full. Annual herbs, like basil, can be pinched when they are 3-4 inches tall.
  • If your herb plants begin setting flowers in earnest, shear back the whole plant by 1/3 and try to start using them more frequently.

Growing Tips for Specific Herbs

Basil Garlic Lavender
Mint Oregano Parsley
Rosemary Sage Thyme

Health Benefits of ” Mint ”

Mentha (also known as Mint, from Greek míntha,Linear B  mi-ta)is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae (mint family).The species  are not clearly distinct and estimates of the number of species varies from 13 to 18. Hybridization between some of the species occurs naturally. Many other hybrids as well as numerous cultivars are known in cultivation.
Continue reading Health Benefits of ” Mint ”

UK garden centre grows Britain’s first black tomato

By: Yahoo UK | A Reblog | A plant nursery has become the first in Britain to grow BLACK tomatoes.
The unusual fruit, which has a jet black skin, is among the first in the world to contain anthocyanins, an antioxidant thought to have a number of health benefits.

Its unusual colour stems from pigments in the skin which develop when exposed to sunlight.

Ray Brown, 66, who runs Plant World Seeds, first came across the unusual fruit when a customer sent him a mystery package entitled ‘black tomato’.
Continue reading UK garden centre grows Britain’s first black tomato

Strawberry thrives in unique hot climate in the Philippines

By: Juan Escandor, Jr. | A Reblog from Inquirer News |  Agribusiness graduate Leonardo Libreja successfully propagated strawberry in the lowland of his town in Camarines Sur; demonstrating that the plant can thrive in a hot climate and bear fruit “sweeter” than those found in the Mountain Province in the Philippines.

It has been a common belief here that plants thriving in cold climate, such as strawberry, apple and tangerine (a citrus fruit similar to the mandarin orange) will barely survive in a tropical climate like in Ocampo town, northeast of Naga City.
Continue reading Strawberry thrives in unique hot climate in the Philippines